Ranges and Transits


Ranges and Transits

Ranges and transits are essential navigational tools. These tools make use of two fixed objects as sail aids. Boaters can constitute a range with any pair of visible charted landmarks. They can draw a dashed line on the chart between two object and measure the direction of that line on the chart. The government marks its ranges on the chats. The closes range marker is usually shorter than the one farther behind it. Boaters and expert sailors call ranges as transits. This term is widely used in Europe.

If you want to constitute a good range, you should use specifically built structures, especially in areas where you need to maintain a straight course to avoid obstacles. Ranges also help sailors avoid boat traffic. Ranges and transits can indicate deep water and this is signal of heavier boat traffic. A handy technique is to stay in narrow channels. It allows boaters to locate their harbors and to make periodic checks.

Range day boards are twice, rectangular, and tall as they are wide. They also have a central vertical stripe. The rear range light is often isophase and the front range light is often quick flashing. Other kinds of ranges have fixed lights. This is, when they are lined up, boaters are on the line of position they mark. If the rear range is to the right of the front range, boaters are to the right of the range line.

It is import to learn how to use ranges and transits to have a good sailing experience. There are many usages you can give these tools to navigate.