Sharpie


Sharpie

A sharpie is a tough sailboat with a flat bottom and an acute angle in the hull. Also, it has a very low design, centerboards and glowing sides. Probably, sharpies were created in the New Haven, Connecticut - United States. Sharpies were sailboats used to fish. These types of sailboats are the most appropriate for being in shallow tidal waters. At the end of the 19th century, sharpies were even more popular.


Their origin of this sailboat is not known with accuracy. Sharpies could be the successor of the canoe and it was arising from iron longboat. Along years, sharpies particularly were used for oyster tonging with a continuous development. Thanks to its advantages, these vessels become one of the most popular. They worked well due to their fast sailing, easy to paddle and cheaply constructed.


The sharpie could reach from 24 to 28 feet. These sailboats used to have just one sail. Meanwhile, larger boats of 35 feet required to be manipulated with 2 sails and had 3 mast-steps. Sharpies hulls were tight with a low freeboard. There was a shallow and long centerboard with a plumb bow at the extremes.  

Actually, modern sharpies like other American small vessels received a special interest from a variety of sailors and designers who have searched shallow drafts for boats.  Nevertheless, most of them are constructed at one time or homebuilt. Some of the exceptions cover these sharpies:  Catbird 24 by Chesapeake Marine design, Mystic Sharpie by Ted Brewer, Norwalk Islands sharpies by Bruce Kirby, Johns Sharpie by Chesapeake Light Craft and more sharpies.